The Hunter Valley wine region

With the Hunter Valley considered to be one of the warmest, most humid and wettest viticultural climates in Australia, it would at first seem that the region was an unlikely place to produce high quality, internationally renowned wines.

it would at first seem that the region was an unlikely place to produce high quality, internationally renowned wines.

However, the long history of viticultural experience (a substantial amount of the local region has been involved in grape production and winemaking since the early 1860s), combined with local knowledge and developed management practices have enabled many of the region’s climatic difficulties to be overcome.

Seasonally, the region’s climate shifts between Mediterranean conditions found in South Australia (Winter rainfall and Summer droughts) and the Northern Australian climate (Summer rain and Winter droughts).

Of the 787mm average annual rainfall in the Hunter Valley, most occurs between October and April.

MORE ABOUT THE HUNTER VALLEY

The rich history of the Hunter Valley region reflects the sometimes complex, but always characterful and rewarding nature of winemaking in this unique region.

  • Established as a wine region in the early 1820s.
  • Amateur viticulturalist James Busby arrived back in New South Wales with a collection of 500 vine cuttings.
  • William Kelman planted a replica set of more than 300 varieties from the Busby collection. It was from this stock that the Hunter Valley was largely developed.
  • Widely regarded as the home of distinctive styles of Semillon and Shiraz.
  • The humidity, the afternoon cloud cover and gentle sea breezes all operate to temper the Summer and afford excellent ripening conditions.
  • First region to fully ripen each vintage in Australia.